Key Lime

The Key Lime (Citrus aurantifolia) is a citrus species with a round fruit, 2.5–5 cm in diameter (1–2 in) that is yellow when ripe but usually picked green commercially. It is smaller, seedier, has a higher acidity, a stronger aroma, and a thinner rind than that of the Persian lime (Citrus x latifolia). It is valued for its unique flavor compared to other limes, with the key lime usually having a more tart and bitter flavor. The name comes from its association with the Florida Keys, where it is best known as the flavoring ingredient in Key lime pie.

Finger Lime

The finger lime has been recently popularized as a gourmet bushfood. The long, rounds have been likened to a “caviar lime”, which can be used as a garnish or added to various recipes. The fresh vesicles have the effect of a burst of effervescent tangy flavor as they are chewed. The fruit juice is acidic and similar to that of a lime. Marmalade and pickles are also made from finger lime. The finger lime peel can be dried and used as a flavoring spice.

10lb Euro Lime

A Euro lime is a higher grade lime with a vibrant green color. It is also known to have no defects or color variation, and the strong, true lime tart flavor.

Lemon

The lemon is both a small evergreen tree, native to Asia, and the tree’s ellipsoidal yellow fruit. The fruit is used for culinary and non-culinary purposes throughout the world – primarily for its juice, though the pulp and rind (zest) are also used, mainly in cooking and baking. Lemon juice is about 5% to 6% (approximately 0.3 M) citric acid, which gives lemons a sour taste, and a pH of 2–3. Many lemon flavored drinks and foods are available, including lemonade and sherbet lemons. The distinctive sour taste of lemon juice makes it a key ingredient in many dishes across the world.

Pineapple

Pineapple is a tropical plant with edible multiple fruit consisting of coalesced berries, and it is named for resemblance to the pine cone. It is known for its sweet flavor. Pineapple may be consumed fresh, canned, juiced, and are found in a wide array of food stuffs – dessert, fruit salad, jam, yogurt, ice cream, candy, and as a complement to meat dishes. In addition to consumption, in the Philippines the pineapple’s leaves are used as the source of a textile fiber called piña, and is employed as a component of wall paper and furnishings, amongst other uses.

Papayas

Deliciously sweet with musky undertones and a soft, butter-like consistency, it is no wonder the papaya was reputably called the “fruit of the angels” by Christopher Columbus. Once considered quite exotic, they can now be found in markets throughout the year. Although there is a slight seasonal peak in early summer and fall, papaya trees produce fruit year round.

Papayas are spherical or pear-shaped fruits that can be as long as 20 inches. The ones commonly found in the market usually average about 7 inches and weigh about one pound. Their flesh is a rich orange color with either yellow or pink hues.

Corn

Corn grows in “ears,” each of which is covered in rows of kernels that are then protected by the silk-like threads called “corn silk” and encased in a husk. Corn is known scientifically as Zea Mays. This moniker reflects its traditional name, maize, by which it was known to the Native Americans as well as many other cultures throughout the world. Although we often associate corn with the color yellow, it actually comes in host of different varieties featuring an array of different colors, including red, pink, black, purple, and blue.

Navel Orange

Navel oranges are characterized by the growth of a second fruit at the apex, which protrudes slightly and resembles a human navel. They are primarily used for eating, as the skin is thicker and easier to peel than a common orange. They are very popular and have a long growing season; in the United States, they are available from November through April, with peak supplies in January, February and March.

Mexican Tangerines

Mexico is the third largest grower of tangerines in the world. A tangerine is a variety of Mandarin orange. The tangerine has some similarities to the orange but is smaller and oblate in shape and has a more pungent odor, a thinner rind, and sections that may be readily separated.

Avocados

The avocado is colloquially known as the Alligator Pear, reflecting its shape and the leather-like appearance of its skin. Avocado is derived from the Aztec word “ahuacatl”. Avocados are the fruit from Persea americana, a tall evergreen tree that can grow up to 65 feet in height. Avocados vary in weight from 8 ounces to 3 pounds depending upon the variety.